Fire Prevention Plans (FPPs)


A fire prevention plan is a hazard prevention plan that assures advanced planning for evacuations in fire and other emergencies. An FPP is a written document required by a particular OSHA standard. Elements of a fire plan would include:
  • A list of major workplace fire hazards and their proper handling and storage procedures, potential ignition sources, their control procedures, and the type of fire protection equipment or systems which can control a fire.
  • Names or job titles of those persons responsible for maintaining equipment and systems installed to prevent or control ignition of fires.
  • Names or job titles of those persons responsible for controlling fuel source hazards.

Incipient stage fires

When a fire is in the initial stage or beginning stage and can be controlled or extinguished by portable fire extinguishers or Class II standpipe or small hose systems without the need for protective clothing or breathing apparatus, it is called an incipient stage fire. When a fire goes beyond the incipient stage, outside help is almost always necessary.
Employers are generally required to provide portable fire extinguishing equipment for use in fighting incipient state fires in the workplace. However, there are several options to use regarding workplace fires.
  • Evacuate all employees to a safe place.
  • Evacuate all employees except those designated to use portable fire extinguishers.
Some insurance companies or local fire departments may require employers to keep portable fire extinguishers in the workplace, even though the employer does not want employees to fight fires and has a total evacuation policy in place. In this case, the extinguishers must be routinely maintained, inspected, and tested.

Fire fighting options

Employers are generally required to provide portable fire extinguishing equipment for use in fighting incipient stage fires in the workplace. Section 1910.157, however, provides alternatives for employers who do not want their employees to fight incipient stage fires in the workplace. Employers that opt for the evacuation of all or most employees to a safe area do not have to comply with certain requirements of §1910.157, depending on the option chosen. These options are:

Evacuate all employees

The employer chooses to evacuate all employees to safety when a fire occurs. Employers that select this option do not have to comply with 1910.157 unless a specific standard in part 1910 requires that portable Revision 4/03 fire extinguishers be provided. If this option is selected, compliance with §§1910.38 and 1910.39 is required through §1910.157(b)(1).

Evacuate some employees

The employer chooses to evacuate all employees except those designated to use portable fire extinguishers. Employers that select this option need not comply with the distribution requirements of §1910.157(d). This option allows the employer to distribute extinguishers so that they are available to the employees who have been designated to fight incipient stage fires. If this option is selected, compliance with §1910.38 is required through §1910.157(b)(2).

Have fire extinguishers but evacuate all employees

Some employers keep portable fire extinguishers in the workplace, even though they do not want employees fighting fires and have a policy for total evacuation. Portable fire extinguishers may be required in the workplace by other organizations such as insurance companies or local fire departments. Portable fire extinguishers that are not intended for employee use may still pose a hazard if they are not properly maintained. Employers who select this option must comply only with the maintenance, inspection, and testing requirements in paragraphs (e) and (f) of §1910.157.

All employees fight fires

Employers who do not select any of these options but instead provide portable fire extinguishers for use by any employee to use in fighting incipient stage fires must comply with §1910.157 in its entirety. Employers that provide portable fire extinguishers for employee use must provide an educational program to familiarize then with the general principles of fire extinguisher use. Those employees expected to use portable fire extinguishers must receive “hands on” training in the use of the fire extinguishing equipment. If the Revision 4/03 employer chooses to comply with all of §1910.157, there is no requirement to comply with §1910.38 or §1910.39.

OSHA standards requiring FPPs

  1. Ethylene Oxide, §1910.1047
  2. Methylenedianiline - §1910.1050
  3. 1,3-Butadiene - §1910.1051

1 comment:

firepronevada said...

It is very important that you know the basics of fire prevention especially with regards to your property and within your own home. It is a good idea that one or more members of your family knows how to put out a fire when it happens.

Fire Extinguisher Training in Las Vegas

Popular Posts