Lockout/Tagout Terminology

Affected employee — An employee who performs the duties of his or her job in an area in which the energy control procedure is implemented and servicing or maintenance operations are performed. An affected employee does not perform servicing or maintenance on machines or equipment and, consequently, is not responsible for implementing the energy control procedure. An affected employee becomes an "authorized" employee whenever he or she performs servicing or maintenance functions on machines or equipment that must be locked or tagged.

Authorized employee — An employee who performs servicing or maintenance on machines and equipment. Lockout or tagout is used by these employees for their own protection.
Capable of being locked out — An energy-isolating device is considered capable of being locked out if it meets one of the following requirements:
  • It is designed with a hasp to which a lock can be attached;
  • It is designed with any other integral part through which a lock can be affixed;
  • It has a locking mechanism built into it; or
  • It can be locked without dismantling, rebuilding, or replacing the energy isolating device or permanently altering its energy control capability.
Energized — Machines and equipment are energized when (1) they are connected to an energy source or (2) they contain residual or stored energy.

Energy-isolating device — Any mechanical device that physically prevents the transmission or release of energy. These include, but are not limited to, manually-operated electrical circuit breakers, disconnect switches, line valves, and blocks.

Energy source — Any source of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or other energy.

Energy control procedure — A written document that contains those items of information an authorized employee needs to know in order to safely control hazardous energy during servicing or maintenance of machines or equipment.

Energy control program — A program intended to prevent the unexpected energizing or the release of stored energy in machines or equipment on which servicing and maintenance is being performed by employees. The program consists of energy control procedure(s), an employee training program, and periodic inspections.

Lockout — The placement of a lockout device on an energy-isolating device, in accordance with an established procedure, ensuring that the energy-isolating device and the equipment being controlled cannot be operated until the lockout device is removed.

Lockout device — Any device that uses positive means such as a lock, either key or combination type, to hold an energy-isolating device in a safe position, thereby preventing the energizing of machinery or equipment. When properly installed, a blank flange or bolted slip blind are considered equivalent to lockout devices.

Tagout — The placement of a tagout device on an energy-isolating device, in accordance with an established procedure, to indicate that the energy-isolating device and the equipment being controlled may not be operated until the tagout device is removed.

Tagout device — Any prominent warning device, such as a tag and a means of attachment, that can be securely fastened to an energy-isolating device in accordance with an established procedure. The tag indicates that the machine or equipment to which it is attached is not to be operated until the tagout device is removed in accordance with the energy control procedure.

1 comment:

Farhan Jaffry said...

This is very good and brief information about logout and tag out training, I would like you to share some light on 30 hour osha training course which is designed for supervisors and safety directors.

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